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Patrick Frick talk at TEDx Munich

August 23, 2010  |  complexity

Patrick Frick from The Value Web gave recently a talk at TEDxMunich where he highlighted the fact that humanity keeps on failing to take much needed collective action with regards to systemic challenges. Based on the MG Taylor Rate of Change Model,  he argues that the underlying problem is that there is a widening gap between the rate of change experienced in our environment and the ability of human beings to respond. This analysis builds on the fact there is a limit as how much complexity a human can process. He concludes that we have created a world, where it is impossible for anyone to understand let alone control the man made operating system of this planet. This is what he calls the complexity gap.
Many of the ideas that he explains during the speech took a generation to mature and are owed to Matt and Gail Taylor who started their work in the seventies. He further explains how their ideas as well as the innovative work that The Value Web has done with the World Economic Forum over the past 5 years have opened up ways to address the complexity gap.
Click here to watch the video.
You can download the text version of the talk here.


2 Comments


  1. Although I am not a designer, I am a writer…and therefore face the same complex issues of reaching a particular vision. I think the “creative thought process” of artists is grossly undervalued, and it has been gnawing at me for quite some time. In the most simplistic terms, I think this is what you are illustrating here? The “artist way” should be studied and used as a model for successful collaboration, and real change. I think their time has come, again, and their ability to “play with ideas” and explore their own imagination,eventually crafting their vision…is quite possibly the answer to many world emergencies. Love this talk! Hoping to hear more about bridging the gap…

  2. Love this talk! In the most simplistic terms

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